Jeffrey M. Levine MD | Geriatric Specialist | Wound Care | Pressure Ulcers - News on Dr. Levine's medical and consulting practice, and reflections on our healthcare system.

Category: Geriatric Medicine

Aging & Spirituality on the Covers of The Gerontologist

Given the subject matter it is fitting that my last cover on The Gerontologist came out in time for the Spring holidays.  I’ve been looking back on my 20 years of covers on TG and blogging on themes that ran through the images.  This post presents a selection of my TG covers that capture Aging & Spirituality.  Previous posts have presented my images on topics …Read More

Pressure Ulcers are an Under-Appreciated Public Health Issue

As a geriatric fellow back in the 1980’s I became intrigued by the wide prevalence of pressure ulcers and how little literature there was on this disease.  Three decades later, they have not gone away and it amazes me that they are not on the list of recognized public health threats.   According to the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research, pressure ulcers affect up …Read More

Music and Art on the Covers of The Gerontologist

A recent cover of The Gerontologist features a musician at the local Octoberfest, a yearly block party that celebrates the German immigrant heritage of my neighborhood in Manhattan that is now only a memory. TG is the flagship journal of the Gerontological Society of America, the nation’s oldest and largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to research, education, and practice in the field of aging.  Looking back …Read More

Aging Veterans on the Covers of The Gerontologist

I always had a soft spot for veterans, as my father saw action in the Pacific Theater and I grew up with his war mementos stashed in a corner of my basement.  A theme in the photos I’ve taken for covers on The Gerontologist has therefore been veterans, with images that reflect their pride in serving our country.  I was recently asked to provide a …Read More

Recognizing the Incurable in Ancient Egypt

The art of medicine is as old as human civilization, and what we think is new has often been done before. When researching the history of wound care I came across an interesting historical antecedent to today’s palliative care practices. I found it in the library of the New York Academy of Medicine in Manhattan, in a translation of an ancient Egyptian medical scroll, the …Read More

Infections Related to Pressure Ulcers are Always Serious

Infections related to pressure ulcers are always serious events because most patients with these wounds are already compromised, and open wounds provide a portal for pathogenic bacteria to enter the body. Reasons for compromise include immobility, neurologic impairment and acute or chronic organ system disease. Begin with a compromised patient, then add an infected pressure ulcer, and you have a serious medical situation that requires immediate attention. Factors that favor …Read More

The Geriatric Workforce and Quality of Care

What could be less intuitive than a shrinking medical specialty in the face of surging demand? A recent New York Times article discussed the growing shortage of geriatricians in America. Despite the fact that there are more older Americans than any time in history, there are only about 7,000 geriatricians in practice in the United States. The article points out that the field is becoming even …Read More

Wound Odor: The View from Ancient Greece

This post gives a preview of what I will be covering in my upcoming webinar entitled History of Pressure Ulcers & Wound Care: Past, Present, & Future, sponsored by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel.  The fascinating history of wound care dates back to the earliest human cultures, where prehistoric bones and cave paintings left hints of wound-healing knowledge.  A major problem associated with wounds …Read More

Insights into Geriatrics from Cartoonist Roz Chast

I’ve never posted a book review but will make an exception for this amazing new graphic memoir.  Roz Chast, a beloved and well known cartoonist for the New Yorker, has written a brilliant book that should be required reading for the geriatric curriculum. It is entitled “Can’t we talk about something more PLEASANT,” and the title comes from her parents’ refusal to discuss their advancing …Read More

New Government Report on Dying in America has Implications for Wound Care

A recently released report on Dying in America has important implications for the standard of care for persons with chronic wounds who are approaching life’s end. It was published by the prestigious Institute of Medicine and written by a panel of recognized experts on the topic of end-of-life care. The Institute is the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences and acts under a …Read More