Jeffrey M. Levine MD | Geriatric Specialist | Wound Care | Pressure Ulcers - News on Dr. Levine's medical and consulting practice, and reflections on our healthcare system.

Category: Art & Medicine

The Meatpacking District Before the High Line

I moved into Manhattan in 1985 to continue my medical training, and in the early morning hours I explored the city with my camera. These are photos I took of the far West Side and the Meatpacking district before the place turned into an international tourist attraction. The photo above is the north end of what is now the High Line, on 30th Street. My camera …Read More

Upcoming Webinar on History of Pressure Ulcers & Wound Care

I am thrilled to announce that registration is now open for my webinar entitled History of Pressure Ulcers and Wound Care: Past, Present and Future, sponsored by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP). This event takes place on November 19th at 1:00 PM EST, and coincides with World Wide Pressure Ulcer Prevention Day 2015. My discussion covers such topics as wound care in Ancient …Read More

Painting in Maine

This past summer I had the opportunity to continue my watercolor exploration in Maine. Part of my journey included a workshop sponsored by Coastal Maine Art Workshops with the master watercolorist, Alvero Castagnet. Alvero’s work is all over the internet and his ability to create drama with paint is simply amazing. During my weeks on this beautiful coastline I expanded my painting skills, trying to fulfill Alvero’s motto: “Capture …Read More

Recent Watercolors

This past winter and spring I’ve been continuing my exploration into the medium of watercolor, drawing inspiration from the bustle of the streets, parks, and people of New York City.  Every day, every minute brings a new tableau of light and interesting humanity.  The scene above is from the south-eastern corner of Central Park in the midst of the last snowstorm of the year. One …Read More

Jean Martin Charcot’s Lecture on Pressure Ulcers: An Important Historical Document

    Click here for a downloadable PDF of Charcot’s Lecture on Pressure Ulcers.  . Some years back while browsing in an antiquarian book sale I came across a translated collection of lectures by the great 19th century neurophysiologist, Jean Martin Charcot (1825-1893). Inside this book I was surprised to find diagrams of pressure ulcers that looked similar to those found in my own patients. I …Read More

Traveling with Winslow

My watercolor teacher Timothy J. Clark introduced me to the life and work of Winslow Homer – probably the greatest American artist of the 19th Century. Born in Boston on February 24, 1836, he was a completely self-taught artist. He began his career as an illustrator, producing work for Harper’s Weekly. His oil paintings of the Civil War and its aftermath established him as an important painter …Read More

Speaking of Vesalius’s Historiated Initials at the New York Academy of Medicine

    Click here for a downloadable PDF containing all historiated initials from the Fabrica.  The medical profession has a long and fascinating history, and if you are interested in learning more don’t miss this upcoming event at the New York Academy of Medicine. The program will take place on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM and is entitled: Fifth Annual History …Read More

Sketching the Subway and the Disappearance of Time

When one rides the subway, particularly the local, time is marked by the staccato passage of stations punctuated by announcements and the in-and-out rush of commuters as the doors open and close. I recently began carrying my sketchbook on my commute to work and noticed that sketching can make time disappear. My observation brought understanding of the right side of the brain, and connected me to …Read More

Getting Vesalius’s Goat

The anatomical masterpiece by Andreas Vesalius entitled De Humani Corporis Fabrica had two editions, the first in 1543 and the second in 1555. There were many changes in the text and woodcut illustrations, but one of the most mysterious alterations was the redrawing of the title page. Both pages feature a public dissection with Vesalius dissecting a female corpse in a makeshift amphitheater, but the …Read More

Goya’s Physician and the Art of Caring

I recently went to Boston to see the Goya exhibit at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and was thrilled to see one of my favorite paintings by this artist – Self Portrait with Dr. Arrias. The painting was on loan from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts – a museum I never had the chance to visit. In my opinion this is one of the …Read More